Getting Ready for Camp

So you’ve gotten a job on one of our summer camps (Good job!), now what? Here’s a list of everything that you need to do

1. Send us your documents

In order to accept your position we will need you to get back to us (check out the email that you were sent) and send us some documents:

  • A colour copy of your passport
  • Your NIE number (Spanish Nationals Only)
  • Your DNI number (For people who’ve ever worked in Spain)
  • Your Spanish Social Security number (For people who’ve ever worked in Spain)Book your travel to get to camp

2. Criminal Background Check

As we are a conscientious employer working in an environment with children (and it’s the law!) we ask everyone who works on camp to have a criminal reference check. Please go here for more information.


3. Book your travel to camp

As part of accepting your contract, you will need to book your flights/train/buses/etc. of how you are going to get to camp. Everyone will need to arrive to El Puerto de Santa Maria for the training week. For more information on how to get to camp please go here.


4. Pack your bags

We require that you bring the following with you to camp:

• If you are from the E.U., an in date E111 form or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) or collaborating document.

• At least three pairs of beige shorts to be worn as part of the camp uniform (TECS supplies the camp t-shirt and polo).

• A sleeping bag as you may be required to sleep in tents or a log cabin at some point.

• For non E.U. staff, copies of degrees (current or past) to show that while working with us you will be part of an international exchange agreement.

• Sports Shoes (staff can not run sports or active evening entertainments wearing sandals as it is a serious injury risk and a bad example to the campers).

• Emergency contact data in case of problems.

• Any needed medication and enough to last the summer.

We advise you to bring the following items:

• For TEFL Teachers your “teacher survival pack”, with as many of your TEFL materials as you can, because the more back up stuff you have the better.

• For Monitors, any aids that you may have that will help your communication with foreign language students, regalia, pictures etc…

• Lots and lots of sun screen; the camp can not supply this.

• Swimming gear (Spain is very hot and all camps have pools and most access to beaches).

• Musical Instruments or items of personal or cultural interest. National flags, juggling balls and guitars, etc… (genuinely tend to be big hits with the campers).

• Bug repellent as the hot climate means there are a fair number of mosquitoes, again camp can not provide this.

• Pocket money or access to your bank as there will be limited times you are allowed to get advances from camp.

• Clothes for time off or nights off. You do have some free time when you don´t need to wear your uniform!


4. Mentally Prepare

1. Forget the outside world. This is not the world of 9-5 living, camp is a 24 hour commitment, 6 days a week.

2. Be prepared to re-find the child inside of you. If you enjoy the activities, the children enjoy them more!

3. Bring reserves of energy and enthusiasm, coca-cola, red-bull, whatever you need, because the camp day can at times seem endless and being enthusiastic is usually the best way to get through stressful and exhausting situations.

4. Get ready to be a parent, sibling and leader figure all rolled into one. The more adaptable the staff member, the better the relationship with the kids.

5. Be the patient wise. Remember the children are from a different culture and often their English is limited, you must inspire not discourage their usage of English.

6. Be prepared for the unexpected. Despite programs and extensive planning, because of the 24/7 nature of camp, some decisions do end up being spontaneous and flexibility and ability to adapt are essential qualities on camp.

7. Be ready for ups and downs. Everyone will experience both on camp and the key to there being more “ups” is being optimistic and focusing on what is good, as there is always good in everything!

8. Be ready for new cultural experiences and different customs. Working with children of another culture and language has different challenges to those of working with children in your own language. Therefore learning on the job new ways of communicating with and controlling foreign language children in their L2 (second language) will be essential to your success.

9. Teamwork, teamwork, teamwork!!! The key to camp is everyone pushing in the same direction. Always remember you represent the team and if you don’t do all required you do let others down. Seeking help and advice when you need it is also essential.

10. Get ready for a personality changing experience. Nobody forgets camp: the little smiley faces, the staff-bonding, the sunshine, the color war/house competition……it’s all going to change you, believe me!


5. Do your pre-arrival reading

Reading of the manuals is the best way to get the most complete picture of work in our summer camps, so make yourself familiar with the ones you can find useful for your position.

When offered the interview you will be given a log-in and the password for the manuals page.